The Foot And Ankle Center Blog

Posts for: March, 2019

Bunions – painful, bony bumps found at the base of the big toe – can negatively impact every moment of your day. Caused by joint misalignment, these bumps can hinder walking and exercising, make shoe shopping difficult, and can lower your quality of life. Although bunions are a fairly common foot deformity, many people needlessly suffer for years before seeking treatment.

Part of tackling bunions before they become a problem is to take proper care of your feet – and to know thy enemy. Read up on some interesting bunion facts below – your feet will thank you:

Blame Your Parents

That’s right – bunions tend to be a hereditary issue. Foot type, including their shape and structure, is hereditary, and some types are more prone to bunions, including those with low arches, flat feet, and loose joints and tendons. If someone in your immediate family suffers from bunions, you have a higher chance of developing them at some point.

They’re More Prevalent in Women

Several studies have shown that women are much more likely to develop bunions than men. In fact, 1 in every 3 women will experience bunions at some point in her life. Why? A few factors may contribute to this problem, including shoe choices and arthritic conditions, which can exacerbate bunions.

If the Shoe (Doesn’t) Fit

Speaking of shoe choices, tight-fitting shoes with narrow toe boxes or high heels are thought to increase your risk for bunions. According to a study by the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society, 88% of women are wearing shoes that are too small, which can increase your odds of developing bunions. Your foot size should change as you age, so make sure you check your shoe size before buying any new kicks.

A Little Care Goes a Long Way

Bunions develop slowly, so take some crucial steps now to keep your feet happy and healthy. Choose low- or flat-heeled shoes with a roomy toe box and good arch support. Avoid high heels and pointed shoes, which cramp and pinch the toes. Stretch out your feet every day to reduce tension as well.

See Your Podiatrist Sooner Rather Than Later

We recommend seeing your foot doctor at the first sign of a bunion. Unfortunately, bunions will get worse without treatment, but early treatment can help reduce your risk of experiencing more pain or extensive interventions in the future.

Suffering from bunion pain? Don’t wait! Make an appointment with the friendly doctors at Foot & Ankle Center by calling (314) 487-9300.


When the snow starts to melt, birds begin to chirp, and flowers finally grow again, that can only mean one thing – goodbye, winter and hello, spring! Now’s the time to get out and be more active, but don’t run out the door just yet. Spring is the time of the year when plantar fasciitis, or heel pain, is most common. Want to protect your feet? Check out 4 ways to help avoid heel pain in the spring.

Walk Before You Run

It’s understandable to want to get out and be active as soon as the weather warms up in the Midwest. However, this can cause strain in your feet. According to Foot Health Facts, “sudden increased activity following several months of low or no activity can result in heel pain.” Start out slow when you get back to exercising by running shorter distances in less time. Build your way back up into a routine and continue from there without pain in your heels.

Stretch Ahead of Time

If you’ve been feeling a tightness in your calves already, a bit of heel pain may come next. That’s because muscles like the ones in your calves are working hard each time you walk, run, or exercise. James Dunne of Kinetic Revolution shows three stretches to fix your heel pain. Try to stretch your feet and legs twice a day to ensure flexibility.

Avoid Trading Support for Comfort

With the warmer months ahead, you can ditch the winter boots and thick socks to let your feet breathe a little. In order to avoid heel pain here, don’t ditch support for comfort too often. During this time of year, people are more likely to wear flip-flops or even go barefoot. By making sure there is support underneath your sole, there will be less risk for pain.

Running Shoes Over Tennis Shoes

The main difference between running shoes and tennis shoes is that running shoes are designed for forward movement and have padding to protect the ankles. Tennis shoes don’t protect your ankles, as they were designed for side-to-side movement. Make an investment in the type of shoe that was designed for the activity you’re planning to participate in. This will have a positive effect on your feet’s health overall.

Feet are coming out whether you like it or not – like daisies! But if you’re having difficulty enjoying the spring because of heel pain, don’t wait for it to get worse. Stop by the Foot & Ankle Center today and speak with one of our friendly doctors.